There’s nothing more frustrating than having the magical powerhouse of microtechnology called the cellphone battery suddenly die on you at 5pm, right as you were trying to make dinner plans.

Because literally everyone owning a smartphone has experienced this problem, it’s no surprise that people would start hunting for and doling out all sorts of little tips and tricks to make their batteries healthier and longer lasting. However, it turns out that a lot of these ‘good practices’ for longer battery life are absolute malarkey. Hogwash. Poppycock. Balderdash. In fact, you probably actually believe one of these battery myths.

Myth: leaving your phone on the charger all night is bad

“Overcharging” is the word that gets thrown around a lot with this one. The concept is that if you leave your phone on the charger for a while after it hits 100 percent, that it will reduce the capacity of the battery. Well, this just isn’t the case (except in the case of you having a bad case, but we’ll explain in a minute).

This myth has some pretty legitimate origins, so it’s no surprise that it’s stuck around. In the days of yore, lithium ion batteries would overheat if you left them charging for too long. However, modern devices are way smarter with managing power. Leaving your device plugged in all the time is just fine.

Myth: You should completely discharge your battery

Yeah, anyone hocking this old wives tale is thinking about a different kind of battery entirely. Nickel cadmium or nickel-metal hydride batteries are what these folks are talking about, and modern smartphones use lithium-ion batteries.

Once again, the myth has some reasonable origins. It’s absolutely true that older nickel-centric batteries would ‘forget’ what their full capacity was if you didn’t fully drain them before charging again. It’s true that lithium-ion batteries diminish in capacity with every charge cycle, but this effect isn’t very large. Most smartphone batteries retain about 80 percent of their original charge capacity even after a few years. Since most users swap out batteries or phones on about that same timeframe, there’s not really any reason to worry about it.

Myth: Always use the official brand charger

This one has its roots in what is essentially marketing. Whenever you get your shiny new phone from a given manufacturer, odds are pretty good that the manual will tell you to always buy chargers from the company that made your device.

Of course they want you to buy their accessories, duh! But it’s not for the health of your phone, it’s for profit. Any reputable 3rd party charger should be just fine. The only ones that you have to watch out for are the super cheap $5 chargers you’d find at a gas station or convenience store. Most of those are just fine, but every once in awhile you can come across some bad eggs that might give your phone a hard time.

Myth: Never use your phone while it’s charging

This one gets thrown around a lot by concerned moms and semi-tech-savvy grandpas.

Some people say that using your phone while it’s charging can make your device explode, catch fire, or electrocute you. But in reality there’s no real danger in playing around on your device while it’s charging. Have at it.

Myth: Save battery power by killing apps or using an app killer

Aaaaagghh! Stop it! Stop doing it; stop spreading this lie. App killers and their proponents are the homeopathy and anti-vaxxers of the Android world: they don’t actually help and they can possibly make things worse.

All that app killers do is suck up the resources they are claiming to protect.

Even if you’re just haphazardly murdering apps that seem to be running in the background by force stopping them or swiping them out of the Recent Apps menu, you’re often draining more battery than you’re saving.

Myth: Disabling services like Bluetooth and Location Services drastically improves battery life

This is another one of those rumors that is still sticking around because it actually used to be good advice. Wi-fi and Bluetooth used to latch onto your smartphone’s battery life like a vampire bat, but today they’re nowhere near so bloodthirsty. And location services are even leaner.

It’s true that disabling all these or going into airplane mode will save some battery life. However, we’re talking a very tiny sliver – like half an hour over the span of an entire day, so the gains are arguably not worth the trouble. Leave the services that you use on the regular running all you want. Your device is designed to handle it.

(original article at: http://www.androidauthority.com/battery-myths-688089/)